Streets & Sidewalks

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street paving

 

The Street Maintenance Section is responsible for the maintenance of the City's road and sidewalk network.  They currently maintain, repair, and resurface 700 lane miles of pavement and 425 miles of sidewalk.  Their primary tasks include pothole repairs, skin patches, crack filling, pavement overlays, sinkhole repairs, and various concrete repairs.  They use innovative processes for higher efficiency and have been praised nationally for the maintenance and care of their equipment.

Streets Hotline:  805-652-4590 (which includes)

  • Potholes and Street Maintenance
  • Sidewalk Maintenance
  • Sand Removal and Drainage
  • Street Debris/Cleaning

Emergency After Hours:  805-339-4399

 

Residents and Property Owners May Perform Repair Work

The City provides options for residents and property ownerns to perform curb, sidewalk, and alley repairs adjacent to their property. If a resident or propety owner chooses to perform the work, the City will issue permits and perform inspections free of charge. Please see the appropriate sections below for additional information.

Alley Repair

Sidewalk Repair

Curb Repair

 

Street Maintenance

The City of Ventura Public Works Department maintains 700 lane miles of streets,13 miles of alleys, 2 million square feet of sidewalks, 350 miles of curbs and gutters, 18,000 road signs, and more than 1 million linear feet of street markings. Although streets are built to last for 20 - 40 years, they begin to deteriorate from the moment they are constructed. Streets with a lot of traffic, particularly heavy truck traffic, deteriorate more rapidly than streets in residential neighborhoods.

To maintain the overall condition of our City streets requires more money than the City receives from its share of gasoline taxes. Therefore, paving priorities need to be established to best utilize the available limited funding for the greatest long-term value.

Where does the money come from?

The City receives about $1.75 million each year for street pavement maintenance and street resurfacing from State gasoline taxes. At this level of maintenance, street conditions in Ventura have slowly deteriorated over time. We project that to keep the streets at its current condition, we need approximately $10.1 million per year. Given this situation, we try to use the available funding where it will have the greatest long term value. Your dollars are best spent when we can use low-cost slurry sealing or cape seals to delay the time when the street will need a more costly overlay or reconstruction. Many residents ask why we are doing work on a good street and ignoring bad ones. We are simply utilizing available funding in the most cost effective manner for the overall road system.

How much does it cost?

There are four types of pavement maintenance: routine patching, slurry seal coating, overlay, and reconstruction. The type of maintenance method used is determined by the pavement condition, drainage, traffic, economic considerations, future maintenance needs, as well as types of material and equipment available. Comparing the cost of each method will help you appreciate why we try to prolong the life of our streets and avoid reconstruction.

Routine patching: $2,000 - $7,500 per lane mile. This includes filling potholes, covering trenches for utility work, sealing cracks, and other miscellaneous repairs to preserve the life of the pavement.

Slurry seal coating:  $15,000 - $25,000 per lane mile.
A slurry seal coating is a very thin asphalt sand and oil emulsion (slurry) that seals pavement and slows its rate of deterioration.

Cape Seal: $50,000 - $75,000 per lane mile.
Coarse layer of hot rubberized oil embedded rock chips with a slurry seal on top of it.

Overlay:  $100,000 - $300,000 per lane mile.
An overlay places a new layer of pavement on top of the existing pavement and can extend a streets life by approximately 15 - 20 years.

Reconstruction:  $500,000 - $1,000,000 per lane mile.
Reconstruction involves removing the existing pavement and rebuilding an entirely new pavement section.

How does the City decide which streets to pave?

The City has a computerized Pavement Management System which assists in tracking and prioritizing the maintenance needs of City streets. The System is based upon the proven concept that it is far less costly to proactively maintain streets rather than allow them to deteriorate to the point of needing reconstruction.

All streets are visually inspected for pavement condition based upon a number of factors including cracking, rutting and wear. The appropriate pavement repair method is then determined and a cost estimate for that repair method is calculated. This repair cost is factored into the traffic load carried by the street to determine a cost/benefit ratio for the pavement repairs.

Major street maintenance is prioritized based upon the cost/benefit ranking. This results in the most efficient use of available funding. All streets are scheduled for repairs using this objective method of prioritization and available funding.

 

Pavement Maintenance Plan

The City has a Five Year Pavement Management Plan. Click on the link below to see the latest  report.

Pavement Maintenance Plan for Fiscal Years 2017-2021.

 

Alleys May be Repaired by Adjacent Property Owners

If an alley is in need of repair but ranks low on the priority list for repairs by the City, an adjacent property owner may themselves hire a licensed paving contractor to do the repairs and/or alley repaving themselves. In some cases, the property owners homeowners insurance will cover part of, or all of, the costs of the repairs, so it is highly encouraged that property owners check with their insurance provider before beginning any repair work. The contractor will need to obtain an encroachment permit from the City, but the permit will be free of charge and the work will be inspected by the Street Section Supervisor. If you want to pursue this option, please contact the City Pavement Maintenance Section Hotline at 805-652-4590. 

 

Sidewalk Maintenance

The City has an ongoing sidewalk repair program based on an established priority system. Unfortunately, the current level of funding is inadequate. The City used to budget approximately $300,000 per year for on-going sidewalk repairs from the General Fund until budget constraints have reduced that number to what is now only $65,000. It would cost an estimated $2,000,000 to repair all of the sidewalks. The main objective of the current sidewalk maintenance plan is to prevent as many trip and fall incidents as possible with the funds that are available. 

Click here for an interactive map of reported disruptions and their repair status.

Residents May Repair Sidewalks

Section 18.010.060 of the City's Municipal Code requires that all sidewalks be maintained by adjacent property owners. The City does provide a level of maintenance for sidewalks that addresses issues in the interest of public safety. However, the program is underfunded and some residents or property owners desire that the sidewalks in front of their property be repaired or replaced in a more timely manner than can be done by the City. In such cases, the adjacent property owner can either hire their own licensed contractor or perform the work themselves (as provided for in the Municipal Code). In some cases, the property owners homeowners insurance will cover part of, or all of, the costs of the repairs, so it is highly encouraged that property owners check with their insurance provider before beginning any repair work. The contractor will need to obtain an encroachment permit from the City, but the permit will be free of charge and the work will be inspected by a representative of the Transportation Division. Please contact the sidewalk maintenance contact at (805) 667-6501 or by email.

Section 18.010.060 of the City's Municipal Code can be viewed here.

Curb Maintenance

The City typically will repair or replace curb when the adjacent sidewalk is in need of repair or replacement, or the street is being repaved.

Residents May Repair Minor Damage to Curbs

If a curb has been reported but ranks low on the priority list for repairs by the City, a resident may themselves do, or hire to do the repairs themselves. This will only be allowed on local streets with traffic volumes less than 1000 vehicles per day and a speed limit of 25 mph or less. Coordination with the City Pavement Maintenance Supervisor is required. The repairs shall be completed as follows:

Complete the following steps to temporary patch repair for a curb:

1. Post No Parking" temporary sign (72 hour in advance) at the curb fix location.

2. Grind down the repair area by a minimum of 3/8" by using a hand grinding tool or hammer and chisel and remove any loose concrete.

3. Wet the surface or use "concrete glue" (i.e. DAP, quickrete, etc.)

4. Fill in the prepped and damaged area with either of the two approved concrete patch materials. May have to use benderboard to keep the repair material flush with curb face if the fill area is large.

5. Form to match existing curb face and top (must use a curb edger tool). Smooth out material.

6. Paint new repairs "grey" or with a portland cement mix (the mix that has no sand in it).

7. Remove "No Parking" after 24 hours

The City Pavement Maintenance Supervisor will inspect the work and no City permits will be required for this work. If you want to pursue this option, please contact the City Pavement Maintenance Section Hotline at 805-652-4590. 

Allowed products:

Roklin "Flex Set"

Roklin Systems Inc.

300 Shell Rd E, Ventura, CA 93001

Rapid Set - 60 lb. Concrete Mix

Available at Home Depot